BC's Indigenous Public Post-Secondary Institute

AECL-251 - Developmental Pathways III - 3.00 Credits

AECL-251 - Developmental Pathways III - 3.00 Credits

Course Details
Developmental pathways III focuses on the multiple pathways of supporting the diverse abilities and growth of young children. The course encourages learners to see young children through many lenses in addition to the western paradigm of competency reaching. Throughout the course, learners will examine how genetics, diverse abilities, culture, and other life experiences play a role in early childhood development. In particular, Developmental Pathways III, encourages exploration of the notion of the term at risk and how it has been applied to Aboriginal children, families, and communities. The course encourages learners to look at how they internalize assumptions related to ways of being and make decisions about working with children based on popular knowledge versus developing an understanding of cultural relevant norms
Part of the:
  • CAREER TRAINING (EDUCATION) Department
  • Prerequisites : AECE/AECL certificate or equivalent
    Course Outline
    Instructors Qualifications: Relevant Masters Degree
    Office Hours: 1.5 Per week
    Contact Hours: 45
    Student Evaluation
    Procedure:
    Assignments 50-70%, Final 30-50%, Total 100%. Grading procedures follow NVIT policy. Projects in this course may include research papers, small group and partner work, directed discussion questions, debates, scenarios, webbing, pod exercises, journal writing, paraphrasing, and review of journal articles.
    Learning Outcomes: Upon successful completion of this course students should be able to:

  • identify and explain multiple pathways for growth in early childhood and understand the importance of supporting each child and their families as they face a unique path in reaching adolescence and adulthood;
  • within the perspective of Aboriginal cultures, define and describe cultural development and how it relates to the diverse abilities of children;
  • explore the concept of child and family development on culturally appropriate ways of being rather than standardized developmental norms particularly in regards to Aboriginal cultures;
  • consider the diverse cultural backgrounds of children and their families as having value in relation to child growth and development;
  • develop an understanding of the value and importance of listening to cultural and family perspectives on raising and caring for children to ensure that teaching stays in touch with community perspectives;
  • revie
  • w child development as a discourse concept from the perspective of Aboriginal and family cultures and follow the notion that development is one aspect of our knowledge base for early childhood education;
  • respond to questions related to their own perspectives of child and family development, assumptions they make in relation to diverse needs, and what they see as standard developmental processes;
  • explore current research of epigenetics and the impacts this may have on early learning individual and family development in relation to colonization and residential schooling in Aboriginal communities;
  • discuss how Aboriginal cultures approach the “we” versus “me” phenomenon in relation to assisting children in development of a community minded identity;
  • question and go beyond the frame of thinking directly related to the use of currently accepted individual and family developmental norms which can be constructs that are based on one way perspectives of looking at childhood; and,
  • describe the notion of the term “at risk” and how it has been applied to Aboriginal children, families, and communities.

  • Text and Materials:
  • Trawick-Swift. J. Early childhood development: a multicultural perspective. Current edition. Upper Saddle River, N.J. Pearson Merrill Prentice Hall.
  • Other Resources:
    Transfer Credits: For more information visit: www.bctransferguide.ca
    Other Information: