BC's Indigenous Public Post-Secondary Institute

ENRT-167 - Intro to Cultural Heritage Surveys - 3.00 Credits

ENRT-167 - Intro to Cultural Heritage Surveys - 3.00 Credits

Course Details
This course is designed to provide the student with an understanding of the importance of a Cultural Heritage Field Survey used by a First Nation Band. The course material is designed to provide each student with the skills and understanding to complete a field assessment for determining cultural or heritage features in a forest ecosystem. Utilizing field labs, students will begin to investigate a variety of culturally significant sites, such as culturally modified trees, spiritual places, land forms, lightning struck trees, and red ocher sites. Students will also be introduced to methods and devices used for electronic field data collection More importantly, this Cultural Heritage course is designed to reconnect students to the land by exploring and identifying culturally significant features left behind by First Nations people.
Part of the:
  • CAREER TRAINING (ENVIRONMENTAL STUDIES) Department
  • Course Outline
    Instructors Qualifications:
    Office Hours:
    Contact Hours: 45
    Student Evaluation
    Procedure:
    Learning Outcomes: Upon successful completion of this course students should be able to:

    • identify culturally significant features in the field (e.g. culturally modified trees, marriage trees, hot springs, and cultural trails);
    • record and enter field data electronically with standardized field forms;
    • identify tangible cultural resources (e.g. historical sites, plants, and animals) in the field;
    • describe intangible culture resources (e.g. traditions, language, traditional ecological knowledge, and oral traditions);
    • identify biogeoclimatic zones and important First Nation indicator plants associated with each zone;
    • use a Global Positioning System application to create waypoints to identify locations of cultural sites;
    • use electronic devices (e.g. iPads) for navigation in a forest cut block;
    • use electronic devices (e.g. iPads) for field notes and media;
    • identify and record wildlife and wildlife features (e.g. kill sites, game trails, browse, ungulate scat, small mammals, nesting sites, and wildlife trees) in the field;.
    • identify hydrologic features (e.g., wetlands, streams, and shrub scar); and
    • identify ethnobotanically significant plant species, used for food, trade, spiritual practices or creating objects.
    Text and Materials:
    Other Resources:
    Transfer Credits:
    Other Information: