BC's Indigenous Public Post-Secondary Institute

HIST-205 - The Metis Of Canada: Historical And Contemporary Perspectives II - 3.00 Credits

HIST-205 - The Metis Of Canada: Historical And Contemporary Perspectives II - 3.00 Credits

Course Details
History 205 will examine the history of Canada's Métis people and their contribution to Canadian life. The historical, cultural, and political aspects of Métis life will be explored. Some of the major topics of the course include: the emergence of the Métis as a distinct peoples, the dispersal of Métis communities in various parts of what would become known as Canada, Métis experience in the armed struggles of 1870 and 1885, the post-1885 life of the Métis, the diversity of Métis peoples, and the modern emergence and recognition of Métis rights. By considering a variety of perspectives regarding Métis history, you will gain insight into the vitality and complexity of Métis identity.
Part of the:
  • UNIVERSITY TRANSFER Department
  • Course Outline
    Instructors Qualifications: Relevant Masters Degree.
    Office Hours: 1.5 per week.
    Contact Hours: 45
    Student Evaluation
    Procedure:
    Assignments 50 - 70%, Final 30 - 50%, Total 100 %. Grading procedures follow NVIT policy.
    Learning Outcomes: THEORETICAL & INTELLECTUAL OBJECTIVES

    Upon completion of this course, the student will possess an introductory understanding of:

  • The diverse histories of the Métis peoples in Canada

  • The historical and contemporary contributions of the Métis peoples

  • The issues facing the Métis peoples in contemporary times


  • EXPERIENTIAL, PRACTICAL, & TECHNOLOGICAL OBJECTIVES

    Upon completion of this course, the student will possess a fundamental understanding of:
  • How to critically read materials

  • How to ask questions and engage in dialogue
  • How to write a write a book review
  • How to write an argumentative, analytical, exploratory essay
  • Time management and study techniques
  • Text and Materials:
  • Devine, Heather. The People Who Own Themselves: Aboriginal Ethnogenesis in a Canadian Family, 1660-1900. 2004. Calgary: Univ. Calgary Press.
  • Other Resources:
    Transfer Credits: For more information visit: www.bctransferguide.ca
    Other Information: Subject to Education Council/Board approval.