BC's Indigenous Public Post-Secondary Institute

Associate of Arts Degree- Criminology


Department: UNIVERSITY TRANSFER
Program Delivery Location: Merritt, Vancouver
Credential: University Transfer
Format: Full-Time, Part-Time
Start Dates: September

Associate of Arts Degree- Criminology

An Associate of Arts Degree in Criminology is awarded to recognize the successful completion of the equivalent of two years of full-time study. It requires 60 credits as prescribed below, inclusive of 3 elective credits. An overall minimum GPA of 2.33 is required.
Upon completion of the Associate of Arts degree, students can then transfer directly into SFU's Criminology program to complete the final two years of a Bachelor of Arts Degree.
The Criminology program is designed to assist students in gaining an in-depth understanding of the complexities of criminal and other deviant behavior and of society's reaction to crime and deviance.
The program emphasizes the importance of meeting local needs and drawing on the strengths and resources within the community.


ADMISSION REQUIREMENTS


Grade 12 or equivalent including a C+ minimum in the following:



  • English 12 (or ENGL 060)

  • Principles of Math 11 (or Math 051)


Transfer
This program is currently articulated for transfer with SFU and UCFV. Refer to www.bctransferguide.ca * for additional information *note that some courses may still be listed as IIG transfers
Year 1
Students are required to successfully complete the 30 credits prescribed below: Elective English UT 100 Level 3 Elective Lab Science UT 100 Level 3
  • CRIM-101 - Introduction to Criminology
  • CRIM-104 - Sociology of Deviance
  • ENGL-110 - English Composition
  • PHIL-100 - Critical Thinking
  • POLI-111 - Canadian Government & Politics
  • PSYC-111 - Introduction to Psychology I
  • PSYC-121 - Introduction to Psychology II
  • Year 2
    Upon successful completion of Year 1, students are required to complete the 27 credits prescribed below plus 3 elective credits. Elective Math, Statistics or Science UT 100 Level 3 Elective Criminology UT 200 Level 3 Elective UT Elective 100 or 200 Level 3
  • CRIM-103 - Psychological Explanations Of Criminal And Deviant Behavior
  • CRIM-131 - Introduction to Criminal Justice System
  • CRIM-135 - Introduction to Canadian Law
  • CRIM-220 - Introduction to Research Methods
  • CRIM-230 - Criminal Law
  • CRIM-231 - Intro to the Judicial Process
  • SOCI-111 - Introduction to Sociology I
  • STAT-203 - Introduction to Statistics for the Social Sciences
  • Course Listing for this program

    CRIM-101 - Credits: 3.000
    Introduction to Criminology
    This course provides a general overview of criminology. It explores the history and evolution of criminological theories and reviews criminological concepts: crime, delinquency, deviance, victim, offender, rehabilitation, and treatment. The course also addresses the relationship between theory and practice, the interdisciplinary nature of criminology, and the application of criminology with a focus on Aboriginal peoples of Canada. More Details on this course
    Prerequisites: ENGL 060 / or English 12 and/or English 12 First Peoples.
    CRIM-103 - Credits: 3.000
    Psychological Explanations Of Criminal And Deviant Behavior
    This course introduces and critically examines biogenetic, psychiatric, and psychological explanations of criminal and deviant behaviour. Special attention will be given to the theoretical links between criminality and genetics, physiology, mental disorders, the endocrine system, personality, moral development and the impact of residential schools, poverty, and mental illness. More Details on this course
    Prerequisites: ENGL 060 / or English 12 and/or English 12 First Peoples, Recommended: PSYC 111 & 121
    CRIM-104 - Credits: 3.000
    Sociology of Deviance
    This course is a survey of major sociological theories on criminal and deviant behaviour, with emphasis on Aboriginal and critical perspectives. Sociological theories will be situated in their historical, social and political contexts and will be critiqued by contrasting their underlying assumptions, their strengths/weaknesses, and their research and practical applications. The course explores the impact of criminal and deviant behaviour in Canada, with special attention to Aboriginal communities. More Details on this course
    Prerequisites: ENGL 060 / or English 12 and/or English 12 First Peoples, Recommended: SOCI 111
    CRIM-131 - Credits: 3.000
    Introduction to Criminal Justice System
    The course will examine the various components of the criminal justice system, and patterns of crime and victimization in Canada, with particular attention paid to Aboriginal issues. Police operations, decision-making options, courts, sentencing and corrections will be reviewed in the context of both Aboriginal and non-Aboriginal communities. In addition, this course will explore Aboriginal traditional and contemporary justice philosophies and initiatives and the youth justice system, including culturally relevant and community-based models. More Details on this course
    Prerequisites: ENGL 060 / or English 12 and/or English 12 First Peoples.
    CRIM-135 - Credits: 3.000
    Introduction to Canadian Law
    This course is a general introduction to the fundamental and competing principles of jurisprudence and to the basic legal institutions of Canada. It focuses on the history of Aboriginal and non-Aboriginal relations and interactions with the Canadian legal system. It also reviews the development of Canadian law, and the roles and responsibilities of community members, elders and legal professionals. It explores legal reasoning and application, the doctrine of precedent, principles of statutory interpretation, the fields of contract, torts, and administrative and family law. More Details on this course
    Prerequisites: ENGL 060 / or English 12 and/or English 12 First Peoples, Recommended: CRIM 131.
    CRIM-220 - Credits: 3.000
    Introduction to Research Methods
    This introductory course explores qualitative and quantitative approaches to social science research. Students will explore the basics of social scientific research from a social science/criminological perspective. This introductory course will provide students with an overview of the nature of research, models of social scientific research, bridging theory and data, research ethics, sampling, observational methods, obtrusive and unobtrusive research techniques, types of research strategies, and analysis of qualitative and quantitative data. The first half of each class will be devoted to research method theory and application, the second half of the class will be devoted to how to write a research proposal and report. More Details on this course
    Prerequisites: 2nd year (200 level)
    CRIM-230 - Credits: 3.000
    Criminal Law
    This course reviews the nature, scope and basic principles of criminal law in Canada. Students will study fundamental legal concepts such as mens rea, negligence and strict liability. The course will analyze the concept of criminal responsibility in Canada and it will critically examine the legislative policies expressed in the Criminal Code. In addition to the exploration of the basic elements of a criminal offence this course will review criminal law as it pertains to and affects Aboriginal and Non-Aboriginal populations including the examination of legal principles as they relate to specific Aboriginal crimes and major defences. This course will also review the impact of the Canadian Charter of Rights and Freedoms and the Indian Act on criminal law. More Details on this course
    Prerequisites: CRIM 135
    CRIM-231 - Credits: 3.000
    Intro to the Judicial Process
    This course provides a critical examination and evaluation of the judicial process in Canada from both an Aboriginal and non-Aboriginal perspective. This course will look at the structure and functions of the criminal court system and its relationship to other branches of government and Aboriginal peoples. In addition, this course will review the appoint, tenure and removal of judges; the social psychology of courts; the jury system; plea bargaining; judicial behaviour of the courts and the courts real and perceived role in Canadian society. More Details on this course
    Prerequisites: CRIM 131
    ENGL-110 - Credits: 3.000
    English Composition
    English 110 prepares students to write successful college essays. This course focuses on the writing process. Students will learn how to develop, organize, write, revise, document, and edit essays. More Details on this course
    Prerequisites: ENGL 060 / or English 12 and/or English 12 First Peoples or permission of instructor.
    PHIL-100 - Credits: 3.000
    Critical Thinking
    While the truth of an argument rests upon a statement's correspondence to the facts of the matter, the logical strength of an argument rests upon the degree to which the claims and evidence actually support the overall conclusion of the argument. This course provides students with the philosophical concepts and critical skills necessary to assess the logical strength of arguments to determine when an argument constitutes a logically strong argument and when, conversely, it constitutes an argument in appearance only. This course offers a much-needed practical foundation in critical thinking skills that will enable students to become stronger thinkers in their own writing and more adept critics of texts ranging from television commercials to political texts of major social significance. More Details on this course
    POLI-111 - Credits: 3.000
    Canadian Government & Politics
    This is a general course in Canadian politics which will focus on the structures of power, the functions of political institutions and the conflicts within the political system as a whole. While the focus of the course is federal politics, some time will be devoted to understanding the provincial and municipal levels of government. Attention will be given to some contemporary political issues (Quebec separation and Aboriginal concerns) and Aboriginal self-government. More Details on this course
    Prerequisites: ENGL 060 / or English 12 equivalency or permission of instructor.
    PSYC-111 - Credits: 3.000
    Introduction to Psychology I
    Psychology 111 is a survey course which introduces students to the field of psychology in general. Students will be encouraged to use a critical and inquiring approach to information presented to them, to be open minded, creative and divergent thinkers. More Details on this course
    Prerequisites: ENGL 060 / or English 12.
    PSYC-121 - Credits: 3.000
    Introduction to Psychology II
    Psychology 121 provides an introduction to psychology in general and focuses on areas of special interest within the field of psychology. The course will provide students with a basic understanding of psychology as well as allowing them to develop a questioning approach to psychology as it is experienced in daily life. This inquisitive approach will be of benefit to students in any further studies they may undertake. More Details on this course
    Prerequisites: or permission of instructor. / PSYC 111
    SOCI-111 - Credits: 3.000
    Introduction to Sociology I
    An introduction to the concepts and techniques employed in the study of social relationships. The course examines diversity and change in society focusing on the impact of social institutions, culture, socialization, social roles and gender. More Details on this course
    Prerequisites: ENGL 060, English 12 or English 12 and/or English 12 First Peoples or permission of instructor. / ENGL 060
    STAT-203 - Credits: 3.000
    Introduction to Statistics for the Social Sciences
    This is an introduction course into the discipline of statistics with an emphasis upon applications within the social sciences. The course provides students with an overview of statistical methods that includes scales, measures of central tendency, frequency distributions, normal distributions, sample distributions, hypothesis testing (also known as significance testing), variability, probability, z-scores, analysis of variance, estimation, and linear regression and correlation. The student will learn to apply these descriptive and inferential statistical methods in interpretations of data and analyses of behavioural research pertaining to the social sciences. More Details on this course
    Prerequisites: or Math 11 Foundations. Please note Math 059 or Pre-Calculus 11 is recommended / MATH 057

    Current Course Offerings

    01 = Merritt Campus
    V1 = Burnaby Campus

    Spring 2018 (January - April)


  • CRIM-104-V1
  • CRIM-104-X01
  • CRIM-131-V1
  • CRIM-131-X01
  • CRIM-135-V1
  • CRIM-135-X01
  • CRIM-230-V1
  • CRIM-230-X01
  • CRIM-231-V1
  • CRIM-231-X01
  • ENGL-110-01
  • ENGL-110-V1
  • POLI-111-V1
  • PSYC-121-01
  • PSYC-121-V1
  • STAT-203-01
  • Fall 2018 (September - December)


  • CRIM-101-V1
  • CRIM-101-X01
  • CRIM-103-V1
  • CRIM-103-X01
  • CRIM-131-V1
  • CRIM-131-X01
  • CRIM-220-V1
  • CRIM-220-X01
  • ENGL-110-01
  • ENGL-110-V1
  • PHIL-100-V1
  • PHIL-100-X01
  • POLI-111-01
  • PSYC-111-01
  • PSYC-111-V1
  • SOCI-111-01
  • SOCI-111-V1
  • STAT-203-V1
  • Spring 2019 (January - April)


  • CRIM-104-V1
  • CRIM-104-X01
  • CRIM-135-V1
  • CRIM-135-X01
  • CRIM-230-V1
  • CRIM-230-X01
  • CRIM-231-V1
  • CRIM-231-X01
  • ENGL-110-01
  • ENGL-110-V1
  • POLI-111-V1
  • PSYC-121-01
  • PSYC-121-V1
  • STAT-203-01
  •  

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